1000 Korean words for everyday use – Basic vocabulary from K-dramas #41

Welcome back. This is the 41st post in the series of 1000 Korean words for everyday use by analyzing the word frequency of more than 1,000 episodes of Korean dramas.

Today, let’s explore the meaning and context of 5 key Korean words “불편하다, 웃다, 울다, 내리다, 위하다” with sample sentences.
Click the play button below to listen to all the words and sample sentences in this post.

 

Basic Korean words : 불편하다, 웃다, 울다, 내리다, 위하다

 

201. 불편하다 [bul-pyeon-ha-da] – to be uncomfortable

– 불편하다 [bul-pyeon-ha-da] describes the feeling of being uncomfortable. It’s the opposite of 편하다 [pyeon-ha-da] , which means “to be comfortable”.
– Here the term “불 [hanja 不]” is a prefix that conveys a negative meaning, similar to the English prefixes “un-” or “non-“, which indicate negation or absence. For example, “불행” means “unhappy”, “불가능” means “impossible”, and “불공정” means “unfair”.

Example sentence:

좀 불편해요. It’s a bit uncomfortable.

 

202. 웃다 [ut-tta] – to laugh

– 웃다 [ut-tta] means “to laugh” and 웃음 [u-seum] means “laughter”.
– Adding ㅁ/음 to the stem of a verb or adjective makes it a noun. 음 for nouns ending in a consonant, ㅁ for nouns ending in a vowel.

Example sentences:

그의 유머에 웃었어요. I laughed at his joke.
웃음소리가 들려요. I hear the sound of laughter.

 

203. 울다 [ul-da] – to cry

– 울다 [ul-da] means “to cry” and 울음 [ul-eum] means “cry” or “crying”.
– Adding ㅁ/음 to the stem of a verb or adjective makes it a noun. 음 for nouns that end in a consonant, ㅁ for nouns that end in a vowel.

Example sentences:

힘들어서 울었어요. I cried because it was hard.
아기가 울음을 터뜨리고 있어요. The baby is crying.

 

204. 내리다 [nae-ri-da] – to descend, to get off

– 내리다 [nae-ri-da] means “to descend, to get off”.
– 내려놓다 [nae-ryeo-noh-da] means “to put down” and 내려가다 [nae-ryeo-ga-da] means “to go down”.

Example sentences:

버스에서 내릴게요. I’m getting off the bus.
물건을 내려놓아 주세요. Please put the object down.
(*Here, 내려놓아 indicates the action of putting down an object.)
계단을 내려가세요. Go down the stairs.

 

205. 위하다 [wi-ha-da] – to do for, to strive for

– 위하다 [wi-ha-da] means “to do for, to strive for” and 위하여 [wi-ha-yeo] means “for, for the sake of”.

Example sentences:

아이를 위해서 노력해야 해요. We must strive for the child.
자, 우리 박 선생님을 위하여 건배! So, cheers to our very own Mr. Park!
(*This sentence uses 위하여 to express dedicating a toast to someone.)

 

Grammar & Study Resources

Whether it is with colleagues, Korean friends or on a date, knowing how to say “cheers” in Korean will help you make friends quickly and enjoy your time in Korea.

If you would like to learn how to say “cheers” in Korean, you can visit the following website.
How to Say “Cheers” in Korean

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